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A Private Operating Foundation’s Perspective On Trust Based Philanthropy (Part III of III): Bringing Trust Into RSF’s Work

Trust-based philanthropy is a trend in foundation-giving that places value in lived experience and shifts the locus of grant spending control into the hands of the community organizations doing work on the ground. As discussed in Part I, because the Robert Schalkenbach Foundation is a… Read More »A Private Operating Foundation’s Perspective On Trust Based Philanthropy (Part III of III): Bringing Trust Into RSF’s Work

A Private Operating Foundation’s Perspective On Trust Based Philanthropy (Part II of III): The “Why” and the “What” of Trust-Based Philanthropy

As discussed in Part I of this series, the Tax Reform Act of 1969 did much to distinguish foundations from other public charities and create legal distinctions between foundation types.  One thing it did not affect, however, was the locus of relational power, which still… Read More »A Private Operating Foundation’s Perspective On Trust Based Philanthropy (Part II of III): The “Why” and the “What” of Trust-Based Philanthropy

A Private Operating Foundation’s Perspective On Trust Based Philanthropy (Part I of III): The Gospel of Foundation Giving

If your life overlaps with the world of fundraising even a little bit, you’ve doubtless encountered the phrase Trust Based Philanthropy. Although the origins of the practice––which describes a grantee-focused style of institutional giving, predate the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, its popularity has increased… Read More »A Private Operating Foundation’s Perspective On Trust Based Philanthropy (Part I of III): The Gospel of Foundation Giving

Revolutionizing Civic Planning: Community_inPUT – A Blockchain-Powered Pilot Study

The evolving landscape of civil planning and community engagement is witnessing a paradigm shift, particularly through the innovative use of blockchain technology. Community_inPUT, an ambitious pilot study, stands at the forefront of this revolution by leveraging blockchain to transform civic planning processes. The implementation of… Read More »Revolutionizing Civic Planning: Community_inPUT – A Blockchain-Powered Pilot Study

Exploring Web3 Technologies in Urban Planning: A Paradigm Shift Towards Decentralization and Engagement

The digital landscape is evolving rapidly, and with it, emerging technologies like Web3 are redefining the way we interact with and plan for our communities. At the heart of this evolution lies the concept of a decentralized internet—a Web3 technology—that operates on a network free… Read More »Exploring Web3 Technologies in Urban Planning: A Paradigm Shift Towards Decentralization and Engagement

A letter from the Executive Director

Fall is here once again.  This change of seasons typically evokes thoughts of colorful leaves; nights by the fire, hot cocoa in hand; and the impending holiday season.  This fall, however, larger, more distressing trends are overshadowing these fanciful notions in many people’s minds.  

Inflation has us paying more – much more – for everything from the food we feed our families, to the gas we put in our cars, to the insurance policies we purchase to safeguard our assets.  And when it comes to our homes (often cited as most Americans’ largest asset) more and more buyers find themselves priced out of a housing market that is increasingly dominated by corporate investors with all cash offers, looking to turn a dual profit as landlords and owners of physical assets that can be borrowed against with ease.

Review: Daniel Mandell, The Lost Tradition of Economic Equality in America: 1600 to 1870. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press (2020)

Historian Daniel Mandell’s fourth and most recent book is an important contribution to studies about the relationship between property, wealth, and history. Published in 2020, this book has not received the attention it deserves. The author has unearthed substantial new material, which along with roughly… Read More »Review: Daniel Mandell, The Lost Tradition of Economic Equality in America: 1600 to 1870. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press (2020)